Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day Roy Thomas. Title: We’re all in the Same Boat, Year: 1984,Medium: acrylic on canvas, Size:122 x 228 cm,private collection.Anishinaabe painter Roy Thomas was one of the most influential aboriginal artists in Canada, and was famous for paintings of colourful totemic animals. Like Norval Morrisseau, he became well known when aboriginal art gained mainstream popularity in the late 1960s and early 1970s.He grew up in the Longlac reservation in northern Ontario, and like other Native youth of his generation was forced to attend a religious residential school. His distinctive style can be seen in the art of younger aboriginal artists, many of whom he had mentored.courtesy:wikipedia#art #painting #figurative #popularat #contemporaryartist #roythomas#artvillecontemporary #artgallery

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day 
Roy Thomas. 
Title: We’re all in the Same Boat, 
Year: 1984,
Medium: acrylic on canvas, 
Size:122 x 228 cm,
private collection.

Anishinaabe painter Roy Thomas was one of the most influential aboriginal artists in Canada, and was famous for paintings of colourful totemic animals. Like Norval Morrisseau, he became well known when aboriginal art gained mainstream popularity in the late 1960s and early 1970s.
He grew up in the Longlac reservation in northern Ontario, and like other Native youth of his generation was forced to attend a religious residential school. His distinctive style can be seen in the art of younger aboriginal artists, many of whom he had mentored.
courtesy:wikipedia

#art #painting #figurative #popularat #contemporaryartist #roythomas#artvillecontemporary #artgallery

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day 
Prasanta Sahu 
Title: Blueprint of an imaginary situation 2
Medium: Acrylic on canvas 
Size: 122x122 cm

Commingling pictures and text, Sahu borrows motifs from the mass media. The black and white photographic images adopt a documentary style of address, presenting a snippet of everyday reality, such as we would be likely to find in a newspaper or magazine clipping. Yet, in Sahu’s oeuvre, this process of citation operates on multiple levels. 

The artist is intensely aware of the pictorial surface of the canvas. Monochromatic pictures are contrasted with vividly painted areas and abrasions on the canvas form interesting textural motifs. However, in his work Sahu moves away from the high-modernist obsession with the formal properties of the painted surface. The paintings operate as performative gestures connecting the realms of art and society. 

For example, if Sahu draws attention to the materiality of the canvas through deliberately disfiguring its surfaces, the technique also highlights the symbolic importance of the image thus blemished. Violence is enacted on the pictorial surface, so that art is no longer the terrain of isolated intellectual pleasure, it becomes part and parcel of our social and political environment: both implicated in its aggression and a place for critique. 

As such, Sahu’s painting functions as social commentary. Acutely conscious of the inherent conflicts in the urban condition, his works draw ironic, sometimes poignant, attention to its underlying brutality and cloaked hypocrisies. The crowd forms a familiar theme in his canvases. Through the depiction of its seething mass of faces, the artist analyses common human sentiments and the complicated relation between individual consciousness and collective deeds. 
courtesy: saffronart 

#art #painting #figurative #popularat #contemporaryartist #prasantasahu#artvillecontemporary #artgallery

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day Baiju Parthan Title: Engineered FruitYear: 2004 Medium: Acrylic on Canvas Initially, Baiju Parthan resisted a career as an artist. “In Kerala,” he explains, “you are what your work is. And in Kerala’s Communist schema, the artist is at the lowest rung of society.” Parthan began as an engineer, but was drawn into the world of art in 1974, when he stumbled onto a book detailing the history of Western art. “With that book,” he says, “the chronology and the institution of art became known to me.” He became familiar with the movements of Impressionism, Expressionism, and so forth, and this new knowledge nourished his interest in painting. "Painting gave me self worth," says Parthan. "In that pictorial space, I was king. I began to define myself through this act of painting: It was the only place where I could ‘be’." Excited by the prospect of studying art, Parthan went to Goa and enrolled in a five-year course in the fine arts. Parthan’s course, running from 1978-1983, overlapped with the final influx of Westerners coming to Goa in search of enlightenment. "There were Germans, Brits, Italians - all sorts of people, mostly from Europe. I came across these hippies, and became exposed to a whole range of alternate world views," says Parthan, adding "I had always thought that reality is one unified thing." Through one of his Western acquaintances, Parthan came across Sartre’s “Age of Reason,” a book that he describes as a major influence. Also affecting his work at the time was Goa’s “soft drug culture”. This, too, helped Parthan explore new ways of experiencing the world. Parthan began to study the Indian mystical arts, exploring tantra, ritual arts, and Indian mythology. Simultaneously, Western art continued to exert an influence. Parthan names Larry Rivers, Miro, and the Cubist painters as important models.In the early 1980s, Parthan decided to quit painting. “I felt like a missionary for Western art,” he explains. Instead, he enrolled in a course on comparative mythology at Bombay University, and began working as a writer and illustrator. He returned to painting in the early 1990s, when he began to explore the imagery of mandalas and Tibetan tangas. These traditional subjects were balanced by his reading in post-modern theorists. The latter enabled him to “recontextualize things from my immediate environment. The post-modern theorists have accepted the localization of reality. We’re now reconciled to the idea of an individual reality. Art is about local realities. Personally, I live in a post-colonial concept of space. The world exists as a flux.” In 1995, Parthan began to study computers, learning hardware engineering, building his own machine, and creating programs. “I didn’t want to be afraid of technology,” says Parthan. “The machine has become the Other for humans, and it raises philosophical issues that we have to grapple with.” Parthan is especially interested in the influence of technology on religious beliefs, the implications of genetic engineering, and the possibilities of post-humanism (i.e. the development of symbiotic relations between men and machines).Based on: Catalogue by Ranjit Hoskote Interview by Sylee Gore courtesy:saffronart #art #painting #figurative #popularart #contemporaryartistartist #baijuparthan#artvillecontemporary #artgallery

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day 
Baiju Parthan 
Title: Engineered Fruit
Year: 2004 
Medium: Acrylic on Canvas 

Initially, Baiju Parthan resisted a career as an artist. “In Kerala,” he explains, “you are what your work is. And in Kerala’s Communist schema, the artist is at the lowest rung of society.” Parthan began as an engineer, but was drawn into the world of art in 1974, when he stumbled onto a book detailing the history of Western art. “With that book,” he says, “the chronology and the institution of art became known to me.” He became familiar with the movements of Impressionism, Expressionism, and so forth, and this new knowledge nourished his interest in painting. 

"Painting gave me self worth," says Parthan. "In that pictorial space, I was king. I began to define myself through this act of painting: It was the only place where I could ‘be’." Excited by the prospect of studying art, Parthan went to Goa and enrolled in a five-year course in the fine arts. Parthan’s course, running from 1978-1983, overlapped with the final influx of Westerners coming to Goa in search of enlightenment. 

"There were Germans, Brits, Italians - all sorts of people, mostly from Europe. I came across these hippies, and became exposed to a whole range of alternate world views," says Parthan, adding "I had always thought that reality is one unified thing." 

Through one of his Western acquaintances, Parthan came across Sartre’s “Age of Reason,” a book that he describes as a major influence. Also affecting his work at the time was Goa’s “soft drug culture”. This, too, helped Parthan explore new ways of experiencing the world. 

Parthan began to study the Indian mystical arts, exploring tantra, ritual arts, and Indian mythology. Simultaneously, Western art continued to exert an influence. Parthan names Larry Rivers, Miro, and the Cubist painters as important models.

In the early 1980s, Parthan decided to quit painting. “I felt like a missionary for Western art,” he explains. Instead, he enrolled in a course on comparative mythology at Bombay University, and began working as a writer and illustrator. He returned to painting in the early 1990s, when he began to explore the imagery of mandalas and Tibetan tangas. These traditional subjects were balanced by his reading in post-modern theorists. The latter enabled him to “recontextualize things from my immediate environment. The post-modern theorists have accepted the localization of reality. We’re now reconciled to the idea of an individual reality. Art is about local realities. Personally, I live in a post-colonial concept of space. The world exists as a flux.” 

In 1995, Parthan began to study computers, learning hardware engineering, building his own machine, and creating programs. “I didn’t want to be afraid of technology,” says Parthan. “The machine has become the Other for humans, and it raises philosophical issues that we have to grapple with.” Parthan is especially interested in the influence of technology on religious beliefs, the implications of genetic engineering, and the possibilities of post-humanism (i.e. the development of symbiotic relations between men and machines).
Based on: 
Catalogue by Ranjit Hoskote 
Interview by Sylee Gore 
courtesy:saffronart 

#art #painting #figurative #popularart #contemporaryartistartist #baijuparthan#artvillecontemporary #artgallery

Artville Presents the third edition of India’s Biggest live Painting Festival to honour Mahatma Gandhi 

Remembering Mahatma - 2014

Event date: 2nd October 2014
Time: 2pm onwards 
Venue: Rangoli Metro Art Center, MG Road, Bangalore

For participation apply online: https://www.artville.in/apply-remembering-mahatma.html
or Email: events@artville.in /
SMS RM2014 to 9742020666 / Call : 080-40944107, 9632250492

Materials will be provided at the venue
Mediums available: Acrylic paints, Charcoal, Water Colour
Please bring your own brush set and other required tools

Selected paintings will be exhibited at 
the gallery till 5th October 2014

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day 
Chintan Upadhyay
Title: SIMPLY A SAMPLE
Year: 2008
Medium: Oil and acrylic on canvas
Size: 84 x 180 in.

The subject of Upadhyay’s work is often babies, animated and stylized against a bold solid background, they are stripped of the simplicity of their vulnerable nature. From blank slate to something slightly more affected, the imagery of culture is impressed upon them visually in tattoo like designs.

The artist began as a painter, but now creates sculptures and installations of which he paints the surface. His most popular sculpture project is perhaps the “Pet Shop” project, which is an ongoing production of a “model baby” for every season. It’s a social critique on consumer society; in a similar vein a solo exhibition of Upadhyay’s at Nagpal Gallery, Mumbai was provocatively named Designer Babies. Transforming painting and sculpture into a pop art hybrid, the painted imagery is often sourced from traditional Indian miniature painting, so on the whole the pieces tend to look forward and look back at the same time. 
courtesy:aicon

#art #painting #figurative #babies #popularart #contemporaryartist#chinthanupadyay #artvillecontemporary #artgallery

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day Vivan SundaramBaricade (with Props)Year: 2008Medium: Digital print on paperSize: 38.5 x 62.5 in Vivan Sundaram, painter, sculptor, installator is a key figure in a group of contemporary artists, who have, over the last decade, moved away from the enterprise of easel painting. Opposed to the comfort of looking at art from a drawing-room perspective or with disengagement, Sundaram, is more committed to realising multidimensional projects which invite audience participation as in open-stage theatre where, the distance between spectator and performer is minimal. You can sit inside a room, or on a car-seat or bed or within a sheltered space, for instance, in a hut with live video and music to experience and evoke multiple meanings. Sundarama’s work is conceived as a cultural product or debate rather than fine art to hang on the wall. It crucially relates to social and political history, the environment and to historiography itself. The viewer can take part in looking and thinking about event and issue and story in response to painted, crafted constructions and enclosures which are placed as excavated phenomena on the stage or, what can be a museum-like gallery space. Alternatively, the exhibition arena resembles an abandoned machine workshop or the karkhana (factory,in Urdu) of a toy-maker. Sundarama’s monumental artworks or relic-like objects acquire different meanings on different sites. An industrial landscape, is polemically represented as a totem-like structure, made with charcoal on paper and a tray of gleaming engine oil; the body of a man, killed in a communal riot, photographed by a reporter is an appropriated image, used by Sundaram as a “Fallen Man” emblem for many exhibitions; the memorial cum gateway,(a recurrent theme) made with tin trunks, the dwellings, cast as the House/Boat compositions or the dilapidated trawler-boat and its fragments are the image-structures which recur as the grammer of the environmental condition he models and re-models. The sculptures are erected and dismantled for shows in different cities.Their architectural instability, their incompleteness, along with the recently, added animistic exhibits of a bed with soft toys and the shell of an old fiat car with velvet seat and neon lights, point to a willful narration about strife, about the seduction and control of mechanical-electronic paraphernalia and about wishing and dreaming. Unsettling the gaze of the viewer is towards a purpose. It is to solicit an intellection to invite participation in the construction of history, and to jostle personal memories his and ours-so that the installation area becomes a speaking space. Sundaram had put up a mammoth installation at the Durbar Hall, Victoria Memorial, (A British-built building in Calcutta, which houses one of the largest libraries in Asia) in 1999. This site specific, turn-of-the-millenium endeavour was an alternative look at history, seen through artifacts of the colonial period and after, put together as cinematic montage and illumined as fragments of a mis-en-scene. (A theatrical- cinematic term, literally, Â’to put into a scenea’) In his latest venture, shelter the structure of the cube, the boat, the carcass-shell of the car, turned into a sofa or turned into an advertisement-object with blinking lights, an odoriferous bunk bed reeking with childhood memories, are things and forms which become a collection to be re-used and hauled from one exhibition into another. The shows demonstrate the aspiration to the condition of architecture, theatre, and the cinema where, remembrance is the key motif and the solid objects are like images in a pop up picture book.In the manner of an itinerant bard, Sundaram rephrases, transforms, renews his artworks as he exposes the deeds and words he has witnessed, heard or conjured himself. In the role of narrator, or a cine-theatrical director, he eliminates himself as author/individual artist. He collaborates with workmen as carpenters, masons, stone-cutters and photographers and video film makers so that the collective effort of many persons is dramatised as though he were unraveling hero-lauds. The actors, in the scenario are expectedly, the visitors to his exhibition. Sundaram has made space for that : To view and walk through the gallery or location in a way so as to be able to re-construct time and saga, individually, and by means of his contrary, often ragged artwork-documents .courtesy:saffronart #art #digital #popularart #contemporaryartist #vivansudaram#artvillecontemporary #artgallery

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day 
Vivan Sundaram
Baricade (with Props)
Year: 2008
Medium: Digital print on paper
Size: 38.5 x 62.5 in 

Vivan Sundaram, painter, sculptor, installator is a key figure in a group of contemporary artists, who have, over the last decade, moved away from the enterprise of easel painting. 

Opposed to the comfort of looking at art from a drawing-room perspective or with disengagement, Sundaram, is more committed to realising multidimensional projects which invite audience participation as in open-stage theatre where, the distance between spectator and performer is minimal. You can sit inside a room, or on a car-seat or bed or within a sheltered space, for instance, in a hut with live video and music to experience and evoke multiple meanings. 

Sundarama’s work is conceived as a cultural product or debate rather than fine art to hang on the wall. It crucially relates to social and political history, the environment and to historiography itself. The viewer can take part in looking and thinking about event and issue and story in response to painted, crafted constructions and enclosures which are placed as excavated phenomena on the stage or, what can be a museum-like gallery space. Alternatively, the exhibition arena resembles an abandoned machine workshop or the karkhana (factory,in Urdu) of a toy-maker. 

Sundarama’s monumental artworks or relic-like objects acquire different meanings on different sites. An industrial landscape, is polemically represented as a totem-like structure, made with charcoal on paper and a tray of gleaming engine oil; the body of a man, killed in a communal riot, photographed by a reporter is an appropriated image, used by Sundaram as a “Fallen Man” emblem for many exhibitions; the memorial cum gateway,(a recurrent theme) made with tin trunks, the dwellings, cast as the House/Boat compositions or the dilapidated trawler-boat and its fragments are the image-structures which recur as the grammer of the environmental condition he models and re-models. The sculptures are erected and dismantled for shows in different cities.Their architectural instability, their incompleteness, along with the recently, added animistic exhibits of a bed with soft toys and the shell of an old fiat car with velvet seat and neon lights, point to a willful narration about strife, about the seduction and control of mechanical-electronic paraphernalia and about wishing and dreaming. 

Unsettling the gaze of the viewer is towards a purpose. It is to solicit an intellection to invite participation in the construction of history, and to jostle personal memories his and ours-so that the installation area becomes a speaking space. 

Sundaram had put up a mammoth installation at the Durbar Hall, Victoria Memorial, (A British-built building in Calcutta, which houses one of the largest libraries in Asia) in 1999. This site specific, turn-of-the-millenium endeavour was an alternative look at history, seen through artifacts of the colonial period and after, put together as cinematic montage and illumined as fragments of a mis-en-scene. (A theatrical- cinematic term, literally, Â’to put into a scenea’) 

In his latest venture, shelter the structure of the cube, the boat, the carcass-shell of the car, turned into a sofa or turned into an advertisement-object with blinking lights, an odoriferous bunk bed reeking with childhood memories, are things and forms which become a collection to be re-used and hauled from one exhibition into another. 

The shows demonstrate the aspiration to the condition of architecture, theatre, and the cinema where, remembrance is the key motif and the solid objects are like images in a pop up picture book.In the manner of an itinerant bard, Sundaram rephrases, transforms, renews his artworks as he exposes the deeds and words he has witnessed, heard or conjured himself. In the role of narrator, or a cine-theatrical director, he eliminates himself as author/individual artist. He collaborates with workmen as carpenters, masons, stone-cutters and photographers and video film makers so that the collective effort of many persons is dramatised as though he were unraveling hero-lauds. 

The actors, in the scenario are expectedly, the visitors to his exhibition. Sundaram has made space for that : To view and walk through the gallery or location in a way so as to be able to re-construct time and saga, individually, and by means of his contrary, often ragged artwork-documents .
courtesy:saffronart 

#art #digital #popularart #contemporaryartist #vivansudaram#artvillecontemporary #artgallery

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day K G SubramanyanUntitledMedium: Acrylic on canvasSize: 60 x 300 in This one of the work comprises five canvases, each measuring 60 x 60 inK.G. Subramanyan is among the few artists who have explored the possibilities of modern art from a different perspective, giving new dimensions to the human figure by making them appear more as characters from various myths and traditional narratives, populating a composition quite the contrary. As an artist he is extraordinarily versatile, cherishing the facility to work in diverse media, sizes, and techniques over a stylistic conformity to a single medium, genre, size, technique, and manner of visualization. A prolific writer, scholar, teacher and art historian, Subramanyan uses his in-depth knowledge of various artistic traditions to create fantastical images of wit and eroticism that are universal in their appeal, yet coupled with iconic symbols drawn from Indian legends and folklore. Subramanyan has time and again aimed at blurring the boundaries between art and the artisan. The artist has also dabbled in glass painting and toy making, even weaving, which is generally considered ‘artisanal’. Even in his written works, the exploration of art as a language or means of communication is a recurring theme. Subramanyan has also illustrated as well as authored fiction for children. courtesy:saffronart#art #painting #figurative #popularart #contemporaryartist #kgsubramanian#artvillecontemporary #artgallery

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day 
K G Subramanyan
Untitled
Medium: Acrylic on canvas
Size: 60 x 300 in 
This one of the work comprises five canvases, each measuring 60 x 60 in

K.G. Subramanyan is among the few artists who have explored the possibilities of modern art from a different perspective, giving new dimensions to the human figure by making them appear more as characters from various myths and traditional narratives, populating a composition quite the contrary. As an artist he is extraordinarily versatile, cherishing the facility to work in diverse media, sizes, and techniques over a stylistic conformity to a single medium, genre, size, technique, and manner of visualization. 

A prolific writer, scholar, teacher and art historian, Subramanyan uses his in-depth knowledge of various artistic traditions to create fantastical images of wit and eroticism that are universal in their appeal, yet coupled with iconic symbols drawn from Indian legends and folklore. Subramanyan has time and again aimed at blurring the boundaries between art and the artisan. The artist has also dabbled in glass painting and toy making, even weaving, which is generally considered ‘artisanal’. Even in his written works, the exploration of art as a language or means of communication is a recurring theme. Subramanyan has also illustrated as well as authored fiction for children. 
courtesy:saffronart

#art #painting #figurative #popularart #contemporaryartist #kgsubramanian#artvillecontemporary #artgallery

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day
VALAY SHENDE
Untitled, 
Year: 2014
Medium: mixed media on stainless steel discs
Size: 10 1/2 × 7 1/2 in

Inspired by his surroundings, Shende uses his body of work to capture the challenges and dichotomies that characterize India today, particularly the striking divide between modern and industrial views on one hand, and traditional religious ones on the other. His recent sculptures, unique in both their process and scale, are intricately built out of minute metal discs, pocket watches, copper-plated fiberglass and other non-traditional materials. The combination of video art and sculptural installations in his practice is also unique, adding an entirely new dimension to classical ideas of sculpture. 
Courtesy:saffronart

#art #sculpture #ironbox #popularart#contemporaryartist #valayshende#artvillecontemporary #artvillegallery

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day Yusuf Arakkal,Title: Generation Gap,Medium: Oil on Canvas Year: 2001

His early abstract paintings with colors reflecting the superficial glamour of city life were followed in the mid-’ 70s by compositions with wheels, drainage pipes and other geometrisized structures which referred to wretched living conditions of the urban poor. Soon his concern with people and wider social issues made him focus on the human figure, though always seen as bound with, even defined by the environment. After a few canvases of a partly super realistic nature dealing with drought, famine, untouchability, etc. He reached his constant style which has a link with a realist basis but generalizes it with a graceful, if non-specific roughness. One of such paintings depicting inhabitants of pipes and pavements won him a national award in 1983. Arakkal works in series of related images- from sensual, icon-like ladies to sick in hospital beds and wheelchairs, urchins playing with kites and paper masks, ironic images of paper politicians and empty chairs bearing human presence. “Throughout he has depicted working -class and village people set against dilapidated walls, among shaky planar divisions, hazy texturing and diffused to sharp and vibrating arbitrary chiaroscuro, all partially enclosed by the frames-within-aflame motif. His figures in moods ranging from vaguely atmospheric to restless, dejection, quiet joy and sensuousness, are flattened as well as plastic, emerging from and nearly dissolving into their backgrounds. Arakkal has worked also with sculpture in wood, stone, ceramic and bronze, did collages, graphics and water colors. He writes poetry and articles on art.courtesy:contemporaryindianart
‪#‎art‬ ‪#‎oilpainting‬ ‪#‎figurative‬ ‪#‎popularart‬ ‪#‎contemporaryartist‬ ‪#‎yusufarakkal‬‪#‎artvillecontemporary‬ ‪#‎artgallery‬

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day 
Yusuf Arakkal,
Title: Generation Gap,
Medium: Oil on Canvas 
Year: 2001

His early abstract paintings with colors reflecting the superficial glamour of city life were followed in the mid-’ 70s by compositions with wheels, drainage pipes and other geometrisized structures which referred to wretched living conditions of the urban poor. Soon his concern with people and wider social issues made him focus on the human figure, though always seen as bound with, even defined by the environment. After a few canvases of a partly super realistic nature dealing with drought, famine, untouchability, etc. He reached his constant style which has a link with a realist basis but generalizes it with a graceful, if non-specific roughness. One of such paintings depicting inhabitants of pipes and pavements won him a national award in 1983. Arakkal works in series of related images- from sensual, icon-like ladies to sick in hospital beds and wheelchairs, urchins playing with kites and paper masks, ironic images of paper politicians and empty chairs bearing human presence. “Throughout he has depicted working -class and village people set against dilapidated walls, among shaky planar divisions, hazy texturing and diffused to sharp and vibrating arbitrary chiaroscuro, all partially enclosed by the frames-within-aflame motif. His figures in moods ranging from vaguely atmospheric to restless, dejection, quiet joy and sensuousness, are flattened as well as plastic, emerging from and nearly dissolving into their backgrounds. Arakkal has worked also with sculpture in wood, stone, ceramic and bronze, did collages, graphics and water colors. He writes poetry and articles on art.
courtesy:contemporaryindianart

‪#‎art‬ ‪#‎oilpainting‬ ‪#‎figurative‬ ‪#‎popularart‬ ‪#‎contemporaryartist‬ ‪#‎yusufarakkal‬‪#‎artvillecontemporary‬ ‪#‎artgallery‬

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day Jitish KallatUntitled (Eclipse)Year:2009Medium: Acrylic on canvasSize: 78 x 138 in Jitish Kallat “…is among the most attentive chroniclers of the postcolonial city seized by the crisis of globalization: he studies its pathologies of violence; he dwells on the fortuitous groups, the crowds of rioters or the assembly of people waiting for a train, that have replaced the cohesive community; he examines the life of labour, commemorates the cyclerickshaw puller and the load-bearing porter. And he records these phenomena, not as impersonal socialscientific memoranda, but through the tender, terrifying immediacy of the painted surface”courtesy:saffronart#art #painting #figurative #popularart #contemporaryartist #jitishkalllat#artvillecontemporary #artgallery

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day 
Jitish Kallat
Untitled (Eclipse)
Year:2009
Medium: Acrylic on canvas
Size: 78 x 138 in 

Jitish Kallat “…is among the most attentive chroniclers of the postcolonial city seized by the crisis of globalization: he studies its pathologies of violence; he dwells on the fortuitous groups, the crowds of rioters or the assembly of people waiting for a train, that have replaced the cohesive community; he examines the life of labour, commemorates the cyclerickshaw puller and the load-bearing porter. And he records these phenomena, not as impersonal socialscientific memoranda, but through the tender, terrifying immediacy of the painted surface”
courtesy:saffronart

#art #painting #figurative #popularart #contemporaryartist #jitishkalllat#artvillecontemporary #artgallery