Artville Contemporary Artist Of The DayVeer MunshiUntitledMedium: Mixed mediaSize: 11 x 22 x 19.5 in"I remember trying desperately to make pretty paintings to sell as I needed the money. But they just wouldn`t come. Then I made a painting `Terrorist on a Floating Land,` and began a two-year long series on Kashmir." An artist like Veer Munshi is one of the few painters in India today who is able to transform his experiences as an exiled refugee into the language of painting. Munshi was born and brought up in the Kashmir valley, but was forced to move to Delhi in 1990 when it was no longer safe for him to stay there.For Munshi, viewing pleasure plays no role in his objective as an artist. His work is very personal and at most times disturbing. It is his reaction to a specific event - in this case, the ongoing political situation in his home, Kashmir - and he wants everyone who views his work to understand what is happening there. Rather than leaving viewers with a light hearted happy feeling, Munshi wants his works to cause reflection and spread awareness. He is a painter with a clearly defined course In Veer Munshi`s paintings we see a reflection of the anguish and fear he felt whilst living in his own home, a fear that plagued so many other Kashmiris as well. Munshi was forced to give up his home and heritage, and witness how men he once knew turned into vicious, killing animals - a theme often recurring in his large canvases.In Munshi`s paintings we also see the artist`s bitterness upon seeing a once beautiful valley ravaged by men intent on nothing but their own gain in the name of patriotism. This farce is reflected in Munshi`s ability to telescope images of pain and hatred over those of the Kashmir that was. Beautiful houseboats lie overturned and neglected in the Dal Lake and the flowers in the Shalimar Garden are trampled and dying. The artist also manages to manipulate the colour he uses to suit the message of his paintings. Reds, oranges and greens, otherwise warm and inviting, are given harsh and dark roles. His purples are potent and the shades of brown always cloak and muddy everything. His figures however seem to mirror a different emotion. One of giving up. Their eyes are often hollow or blank and they bend and bow subserviently to captors like vultures that prey over them. One figure that occurs quite often in his work is that of the puppet master. A person who pulls the strings and controls all the others, manipulating the future of the valley. He stands in demolished doorways and the remains of arches, observing the havoc he has played. Fascinatingly, the figure of the puppet master resembles that of Munshi himself. Today, eleven years later, the immediacy has disappeared from Munshi`s work. The problem, rather than fading away, has intensified and the artist has moved from a loud activism to a quiet acceptance and deeper understanding of the fate of his homeland. He says, “Today I view Kashmir alternatively - as a nostalgic memory and as a problem.” This was reflected in the installation Munshi put up in 2001 - an upturned market boat, the symbol of Kashmiri living, was transformed into a coffin, and ten pictures of the artist on its sides were labeled secessionist, refugee, displaced, fundamentalist and other things Kashmiris were called. Munshi`s canvases present images that are intriguing. They cross average notions of reality and pass into a surreal realm. He works in oils and sometimes sketches in charcoal. In 1999 he led the team of designers of the Jammu and Kashmir tableau that won the first prize in the annual republic day parade.courtesy:saffronart#art #sculpture #figurarive #wheels #popularart #contemporaryartist#veermunshi #artvillecontemporary #artgallery

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day
Veer Munshi
Untitled
Medium: Mixed media
Size: 11 x 22 x 19.5 in

"I remember trying desperately to make pretty paintings to sell as I needed the money. But they just wouldn`t come. Then I made a painting `Terrorist on a Floating Land,` and began a two-year long series on Kashmir." 

An artist like Veer Munshi is one of the few painters in India today who is able to transform his experiences as an exiled refugee into the language of painting. Munshi was born and brought up in the Kashmir valley, but was forced to move to Delhi in 1990 when it was no longer safe for him to stay there.

For Munshi, viewing pleasure plays no role in his objective as an artist. His work is very personal and at most times disturbing. It is his reaction to a specific event - in this case, the ongoing political situation in his home, Kashmir - and he wants everyone who views his work to understand what is happening there. Rather than leaving viewers with a light hearted happy feeling, Munshi wants his works to cause reflection and spread awareness. He is a painter with a clearly defined course In Veer Munshi`s paintings we see a reflection of the anguish and fear he felt whilst living in his own home, a fear that plagued so many other Kashmiris as well. Munshi was forced to give up his home and heritage, and witness how men he once knew turned into vicious, killing animals - a theme often recurring in his large canvases.

In Munshi`s paintings we also see the artist`s bitterness upon seeing a once beautiful valley ravaged by men intent on nothing but their own gain in the name of patriotism. This farce is reflected in Munshi`s ability to telescope images of pain and hatred over those of the Kashmir that was. Beautiful houseboats lie overturned and neglected in the Dal Lake and the flowers in the Shalimar Garden are trampled and dying. The artist also manages to manipulate the colour he uses to suit the message of his paintings. Reds, oranges and greens, otherwise warm and inviting, are given harsh and dark roles. His purples are potent and the shades of brown always cloak and muddy everything. 

His figures however seem to mirror a different emotion. One of giving up. Their eyes are often hollow or blank and they bend and bow subserviently to captors like vultures that prey over them. One figure that occurs quite often in his work is that of the puppet master. A person who pulls the strings and controls all the others, manipulating the future of the valley. He stands in demolished doorways and the remains of arches, observing the havoc he has played. Fascinatingly, the figure of the puppet master resembles that of Munshi himself. 

Today, eleven years later, the immediacy has disappeared from Munshi`s work. The problem, rather than fading away, has intensified and the artist has moved from a loud activism to a quiet acceptance and deeper understanding of the fate of his homeland. He says, “Today I view Kashmir alternatively - as a nostalgic memory and as a problem.” 

This was reflected in the installation Munshi put up in 2001 - an upturned market boat, the symbol of Kashmiri living, was transformed into a coffin, and ten pictures of the artist on its sides were labeled secessionist, refugee, displaced, fundamentalist and other things Kashmiris were called. 

Munshi`s canvases present images that are intriguing. They cross average notions of reality and pass into a surreal realm. He works in oils and sometimes sketches in charcoal. In 1999 he led the team of designers of the Jammu and Kashmir tableau that won the first prize in the annual republic day parade.
courtesy:saffronart

#art #sculpture #figurarive #wheels #popularart #contemporaryartist#veermunshi #artvillecontemporary #artgallery

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day 
Damien Hirst 
Second Series Biopsy: M132/244-Lung_cancer._scanning_electron _micrograph-
Year: 2010
Medium: Inkjet print and household gloss on canvas with pins and glass
Size: 62.6 x 48 in

Since the late 1980’s, Hirst has used a varied practise of installation, sculpture, painting and drawing to explore the complex relationship between art, life and death. Explaining: “Art’s about life and it can’t really be about anything else … there isn’t anything else,” Hirst’s work investigates and challenges contemporary belief systems, and dissects the tensions and uncertainties at the heart of human experience.[1]

Hirst developed his interest in exploring the “unacceptable idea” of death as a teenager in Leeds. From the age of sixteen, he made regular visits to the anatomy department of Leeds Medical School in order to make life drawings (‘With Dead Head’ (1991)). The experiences served to establish the difficulties he perceived in reconciling the idea of death in life. Of the prominence of death in his work (‘A Thousand Years’ (1990)) he has explained: “You can frighten people with death or an idea of their own mortality, or it can actually give them vigour.”[2]

At Goldsmiths, Hirst’s understanding of the distinction between painting and sculpture changed significantly, and he began work on some of his most important series. The ‘Medicine Cabinets’ created in his second year combined the aesthetics of minimalism with Hirst’s observation that, “science is the new religion for many people. It’s as simple and as complicated as that really.”[3] This is one of his most enduring themes, and was most powerfully manifested in the installation work, ‘Pharmacy’ (1992).

Whilst in his second year, Hirst conceived and curated ‘Freeze’ – a group exhibition in three phases. The exhibition of Goldsmiths students is commonly acknowledged to have been the launching point not only for Hirst, but for a generation of British artists. For its final phase he painted two series of coloured spots on to the warehouse walls. Hirst describes the spot paintings as a means of “pinning down the joy of colour”, and explains they provided a solution to all problems he’d previously had with colour. It has become one of the artist’s most prolific and recognisable series, and in January 2012 the works were exhibited in a show of unprecedented scale across eleven Gagosian Gallery locations worldwide.[4]

In 1991 Hirst began work on ‘Natural History’, arguably his most famous series. Through preserving creatures in minimalist steel and glass tanks filled with formaldehyde solution, he intended to create a “zoo of dead animals”.[5] In 1992, the shark piece, ‘The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living’ (1991) was unveiled at the Saatchi Gallery’s ‘Young British Artists I’ exhibition. The shark, described by the artist as a “thing to describe a feeling”, remains one of the most iconic symbols of modern British art and popular culture in the 90’s. The series typifies Hirst’s interest in display mechanisms. The glass boxes he employs both in ‘Natural History’ works and in vitrines, such as ‘The Acquired Inability to Escape’ (1991), act to define the artwork’s space, whilst simultaneously commenting on the “fragility of existence”.[6]

Since his involvement in ‘Freeze’ in 1988, curatorial projects have remained important to the artist. In 1994 he organised the international group exhibition ‘Some Went Mad, Some Ran Away’ at the Serpentine Gallery. Over a decade later, and explaining that he considers collections to constitute a “map of a man’s life”, he curated an award-winning exhibition of work from his ‘Murderme’ collection: ‘In the darkest hour there may be light’ (2006, Serpentine Gallery).

Stating: “I am absolutely not interested in tying things down”, Hirst has continued over the last decade to explore the “big issues” of “death, life, religion, beauty, science.”[7] In 2007, he unveiled the spectacular, ‘For the Love of God’ (2007): a platinum cast of a skull set with 8,601 flawless pavé-set diamonds, at the White Cube exhibition ‘Beyond Belief’. The following year, he took the unprecedented step of bypassing gallery involvement in selling 244 new works at Sotheby’s auction house in London. Describing the sale as a means of democratising the art market, the ‘Beautiful Inside My Head Forever’ auction followed Hirst’s Sotheby’s event in 2004, in which the entire contents of the artist’s restaurant venture, Pharmacy, were sold.
courtesy:damienhirst

#art #painting #biospy #scanning #lungcancer #popularart#contemporaryartist #damienhirst #artvillecontemporary #artgallery

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day
TAKASHI MURAKAMI
Title: Self-Portrait of the Manifold Worries of a Manifoldly Distressed Artist,
Year: 2012
Medium: Acrylic on canvas mounted on board
Size: 59 x 59 in

A lightning rod between different cultural valencies (high/low, ancient/modern, oriental/occidental), Takashi Murakami has stated that the artist is someone who understands the borders between worlds and who makes an effort to know them. With his distinctive “Superflat” style and ethos, which employs highly refined classical Japanese painting techniques to depict a super-charged mix of Pop, animé and otaku content within a flattened representational picture-plane, he moves freely within an ever-expanding field of aesthetic issues and cultural inspirations. Parallel to utopian and dystopian themes, he recollects and revitalizes narratives of transcendence and enlightenment, often involving outsider-savants. Mining religious and secular subjects favored by the so-called Japanese “eccentrics” or non-conformist artists of the Early Modern era commonly considered to be counterparts of the Western Romantic tradition, Murakami situates himself within their legacy of bold and lively individualism in a manner that is entirely his own and of his time.
couetesy:gagosian

#art #acrylicpainting #figurative #popularart #contemporaryartist #japaneseartist #takashimurakami #artvillecontemporary #artgallery
Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day Prasanta SahuYear: 2007Medium: Acrylic on canvasSize: 72 x 36 inThe artist is intensely aware of the pictorial surface of the canvas. Monochromatic pictures are contrasted with vividly painted areas and abrasions on the canvas form interesting textural motifs. However, in his work Sahu moves away from the high-modernist obsession with the formal properties of the painted surface. The paintings operate as performative gestures connecting the realms of art and society. For example, if Sahu draws attention to the materiality of the canvas through deliberately disfiguring its surfaces, the technique also highlights the symbolic importance of the image thus blemished. Violence is enacted on the pictorial surface, so that art is no longer the terrain of isolated intellectual pleasure, it becomes part and parcel of our social and political environment: both implicated in its aggression and a place for critique.courtesy:aicon#art #painting #figurative #popularart #prasantasahu #artvillecontemporary#artgallery

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day 
Prasanta Sahu
Year: 2007
Medium: Acrylic on canvas
Size: 72 x 36 in

The artist is intensely aware of the pictorial surface of the canvas. Monochromatic pictures are contrasted with vividly painted areas and abrasions on the canvas form interesting textural motifs. However, in his work Sahu moves away from the high-modernist obsession with the formal properties of the painted surface. The paintings operate as performative gestures connecting the realms of art and society. 
For example, if Sahu draws attention to the materiality of the canvas through deliberately disfiguring its surfaces, the technique also highlights the symbolic importance of the image thus blemished. Violence is enacted on the pictorial surface, so that art is no longer the terrain of isolated intellectual pleasure, it becomes part and parcel of our social and political environment: both implicated in its aggression and a place for critique.
courtesy:aicon

#art #painting #figurative #popularart #prasantasahu #artvillecontemporary#artgallery

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day  Jogen Chowdhury Title: Flower Vase Year: 2004 Medium: Pastel and marker on paper pasted on board Size: 14.5 x 11 in  Jogen Chowdhury is known for his ability to successfully marry traditional imagery with the zeitgeist of contemporary painting, in a skillful blend of an urbane self-awareness and a highly localized Bengali influence. His early works show an attention to figuration that carries through in his current pieces. In an interview, Chowdhury commented that, in his early works, “the space projected a simple iconic presence. A spatial sequence was worked out but the space was not complex. The background seemed to vanish.” Anshuman Dasgupta describes these works as more iconic and more dramatized; per contra, Chowdhury describes his later works as “now more personalized and subtle”. During his college days, Chowdhury took part in leftist literary circles, the members of which dismissed Rabindranath Tagore as a bourgeoisie and became interested in the works of Russian authors. But by and large, Chowdhury kept himself apart from cultural movements: though a friend of the members of the Hungry Generation, his imagery was drawn from his cultural background more than his intellectual milieu. “My background is relevant,” he once remarked in an interview, explaining that his life in Calcutta was “quite disturbed with political movements. This has a definite influence on my work like the Ganesha period. The Bengali business class worshipping the icon, and their corruption, how they degenerate just like the flesh.” The famine, the Partition, and the food movement all cast a pall over his formative years, and a quality of darkness may be seen to inhere in Chowdhury’s work. Yet as well as an indicator of sadness, this darkness can be understood to evoke an aura of mystery. It is an effect enhanced in Chowdhury’s more recent works, which, increasingly, crop the central image. Chowdhury explains that “The purpose is to hide some parts. The moment I show the entire figure, the interest in the details would be lost. Earlier on, the figures were observed in their natural bearings which came through expressionistic stylization and the weight of reality was greater. There is an effect of distancing today.” courtesy:saffronart#art #painting #mixmedia #stilllife #popularart #contemporaryartist #jogenchowdhury #artvillecontemporary #artgallery

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day
Jogen Chowdhury
Title: Flower Vase
Year: 2004
Medium: Pastel and marker on paper pasted on board
Size: 14.5 x 11 in

Jogen Chowdhury is known for his ability to successfully marry traditional imagery with the zeitgeist of contemporary painting, in a skillful blend of an urbane self-awareness and a highly localized Bengali influence. His early works show an attention to figuration that carries through in his current pieces. In an interview, Chowdhury commented that, in his early works, “the space projected a simple iconic presence. A spatial sequence was worked out but the space was not complex. The background seemed to vanish.” Anshuman Dasgupta describes these works as more iconic and more dramatized; per contra, Chowdhury describes his later works as “now more personalized and subtle”.

During his college days, Chowdhury took part in leftist literary circles, the members of which dismissed Rabindranath Tagore as a bourgeoisie and became interested in the works of Russian authors. But by and large, Chowdhury kept himself apart from cultural movements: though a friend of the members of the Hungry Generation, his imagery was drawn from his cultural background more than his intellectual milieu.

“My background is relevant,” he once remarked in an interview, explaining that his life in Calcutta was “quite disturbed with political movements. This has a definite influence on my work like the Ganesha period. The Bengali business class worshipping the icon, and their corruption, how they degenerate just like the flesh.” The famine, the Partition, and the food movement all cast a pall over his formative years, and a quality of darkness may be seen to inhere in Chowdhury’s work. Yet as well as an indicator of sadness, this darkness can be understood to evoke an aura of mystery. It is an effect enhanced in Chowdhury’s more recent works, which, increasingly, crop the central image. Chowdhury explains that “The purpose is to hide some parts. The moment I show the entire figure, the interest in the details would be lost. Earlier on, the figures were observed in their natural bearings which came through expressionistic stylization and the weight of reality was greater. There is an effect of distancing today.”
courtesy:saffronart

#art #painting #mixmedia #stilllife #popularart #contemporaryartist #jogenchowdhury #artvillecontemporary #artgallery

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day Gieve PatelTitle: EktaraYear: 1992Medium: Acrylic on canvasSize: 67 x 75 inGieve Patel inhabits many garbs including those of a physician, poet, playwright and artist. His artworks draw their energy from various human situations and everyday life. A sense of keen observation is evident in his writing and his art alike. A closer look at the elements that define his visuality - human figures, posture and gestures, landscape and cityscapes - all of which manifest a sincere rendition of everyday life, reveals a sense of depth which invites a contemplative gaze. Although rendering idyllic scenes from everyday life, Patel’s works have much more to reveal than what immediately meets the eye. A closer look unveils a thoughtful and laborious artistic process. A contemporary of Patel and an artist himself, Sudhir Patwardhan has written about Patel’s works. He notes, “Patel is an artist who spends a lot of time looking. Looking at nature, looking at people, and also looking at his own work in progress. The need to look for long, and again, comes from a commitment to try and see everything in its wholeness. To take note of and accommodate all aspects into the complete picture. The need to look comes also from a genuine delight in the activity of the senses. The artist enjoys just looking. Be it a tree trunk, the sea, or the body of a labourer, close observation opens up for the artist the many nuanced shades of the character of his subject. At the same time, the artist’s close attention to his own act of looking exposes the complex and at times contrary impulses that attract him to his subject. Patel’s experience of looking in this intricate web of fact, desire, delight, disgust, empathy… Patel values this complex experience, its uncertainties and doubts. Though he never tires of thinking about and analyzing experience, he is not inclined to fix its meaning too easily.courtesy:saffronart #art #acrylicpainting #figurative #landscape #popularart#contemporaryartist #gievepatel #artvillecontemporary#artgallery
Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day 
Gieve Patel
Title: Ektara
Year: 1992
Medium: Acrylic on canvas
Size: 67 x 75 in

Gieve Patel inhabits many garbs including those of a physician, poet, playwright and artist. His artworks draw their energy from various human situations and everyday life. A sense of keen observation is evident in his writing and his art alike. A closer look at the elements that define his visuality - human figures, posture and gestures, landscape and cityscapes - all of which manifest a sincere rendition of everyday life, reveals a sense of depth which invites a contemplative gaze. 
Although rendering idyllic scenes from everyday life, Patel’s works have much more to reveal than what immediately meets the eye. A closer look unveils a thoughtful and laborious artistic process. A contemporary of Patel and an artist himself, Sudhir Patwardhan has written about Patel’s works. He notes, “Patel is an artist who spends a lot of time looking. Looking at nature, looking at people, and also looking at his own work in progress. The need to look for long, and again, comes from a commitment to try and see everything in its wholeness. To take note of and accommodate all aspects into the complete picture. The need to look comes also from a genuine delight in the activity of the senses. The artist enjoys just looking. Be it a tree trunk, the sea, or the body of a labourer, close observation opens up for the artist the many nuanced shades of the character of his subject. At the same time, the artist’s close attention to his own act of looking exposes the complex and at times contrary impulses that attract him to his subject. Patel’s experience of looking in this intricate web of fact, desire, delight, disgust, empathy… Patel values this complex experience, its uncertainties and doubts. Though he never tires of thinking about and analyzing experience, he is not inclined to fix its meaning too easily.
courtesy:saffronart 

#art #acrylicpainting #figurative #landscape #popularart#contemporaryartist #gievepatel #artvillecontemporary#artgallery
Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day Shibu NatesanTitle: ApproachMedium: Oil on linenYear: 2005Size: 42 x 40 inShibu Natesan belongs to a generation of artists from Kerala who studied at the College of Fine Arts in Trivandrum during the early eighties, a time of continuing change and rebellion against a bureaucratic and stultified art establishment. The films of John Abraham and G. Aravindan were one aspect of the cultural climate of the time, and formative, along with translations of Latin American and African literature, of the minds and attitudes of young artists. His first significant body of work, a series of paintings entitled “The Futility of Device” derives from a feudal history excavated in painstaking detail, the relics displayed in the grim chambers of memory, symbols of aggression which repeat themselves with oppressive regularity. The atmospheric quality of these works, some of them based on photographs of archaeological remains such as the caves at Ajanta, is heightened by the use of metallic paint on canvas.Shibu spent two years, between 1996 - ‘97 at the Rijksakademie in Amsterdam, and his recent “Missing” series of paintings is representative of the change that occurred duing the time. The use of photography here is even more literal, though still adhering to a stubborn involvement with the processes of painting, their capacity to shift and re-focus the gaze to glean hitherto unperceived information. There is a simulation which resembles the original to a startling degree, but which in fact prompts a set of readings which are contrary to what was intended, thus displacing the meaning without significantly altering it’s appearance. Things are not what they seem to be; the actuality and sanity which these images once claimed is suddenly suspect.courtesy:saffronart#art #painting #conceptual #figurative #popularart #contemporaryartist#Shibunatesan #artvillecontemporary #artgallery

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day 
Shibu Natesan
Title: Approach
Medium: Oil on linen
Year: 2005
Size: 42 x 40 in

Shibu Natesan belongs to a generation of artists from Kerala who studied at the College of Fine Arts in Trivandrum during the early eighties, a time of continuing change and rebellion against a bureaucratic and stultified art establishment. The films of John Abraham and G. Aravindan were one aspect of the cultural climate of the time, and formative, along with translations of Latin American and African literature, of the minds and attitudes of young artists. His first significant body of work, a series of paintings entitled “The Futility of Device” derives from a feudal history excavated in painstaking detail, the relics displayed in the grim chambers of memory, symbols of aggression which repeat themselves with oppressive regularity. The atmospheric quality of these works, some of them based on photographs of archaeological remains such as the caves at Ajanta, is heightened by the use of metallic paint on canvas.

Shibu spent two years, between 1996 - ‘97 at the Rijksakademie in Amsterdam, and his recent “Missing” series of paintings is representative of the change that occurred duing the time. The use of photography here is even more literal, though still adhering to a stubborn involvement with the processes of painting, their capacity to shift and re-focus the gaze to glean hitherto unperceived information. 

There is a simulation which resembles the original to a startling degree, but which in fact prompts a set of readings which are contrary to what was intended, thus displacing the meaning without significantly altering it’s appearance. Things are not what they seem to be; the actuality and sanity which these images once claimed is suddenly suspect.
courtesy:saffronart

#art #painting #conceptual #figurative #popularart #contemporaryartist#Shibunatesan #artvillecontemporary #artgallery

Artville Contemporary Artits Of The Day 
Bharti Kher 
Titile: Ghost Room 

Bharti Kher
Bharti Kher’s is an art of dislocation and transience, reflecting her own, largely itinerant life. Born and raised in England, the artist moved to New Delhi in the early 1990s after her formal training in the field, and today, like most of her contemporaries, frequently travels the world attending to exhibitions of her art. Consequently, the concept of home as the location of identity and culture is constantly challenged in her body of work. In addition to an autobiographical examination of identity, Kher’s unique perspective also facilitates an outsider’s ethnographic observation of contemporary life, class and consumerism in urban India. 

Presently, Kher uses the ‘bindi’, a dot indicative of the third eye worn by the Indian women on their foreheads, as the central motif and most basic building block in her work. Bharti Kher often refers to her mixed media works with bindis, the mass-produced, yet traditional ornaments, as ‘action paintings’. Painstakingly placed on the surface one-by-one to form a design, the multi-coloured bindis represent custom, often inflexible, as well as the dynamic ways in which it is produced and consumed today. The artist is also known for her collection of wild and unusual resin-cast sculptures, embellished with bindis, and her digital photography.
courtesy:saffronart

#art #sculpture #newmedia #figurative #ghostroom #popularart#contemporaryartist #bhartikher #artvillecontemporary #artgallery
Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day T M AzisUntitledYear: 2007Medium: Watercolor on paperSize: 30 x 22 in T.M. Azis is known to create human figures interacting with the other elements in a painting. Figures or objects performing as symbols spinning around allegories as conceived by the artist. He creates paintings, which record what might be ordinary, everyday occurrences, contemplated by him. A certain insight into behavioral thought, we realise that there is a world different from what see – the world that exists in our minds. It is interesting to note that there are no decisive tactics, no fixed strategies in his work. Azis allows himself to be influenced by places around him and situations that he encounters. Simple objects and people in their vicinities rejoice in their existence by being involved in what is around. The paintings do not project a grand décor, and even with its simplicity there is a certain magic and lightness about it. The different conversations performed by figures with the ‘designs’ lines or concentric circles in the paintings pleasantly create subtle movements on the surface reciting a visual rhythm to the viewer. The paintings are constructed using bright colors sometimes and sometimes not so contrasting colors, which plainly have strong individual personas expressing a subtle theater of visual form. In today’s contemporary art scenario, artists are fast adapting to new trends. T.M. Azis, primarily a painter, has also a prolific collection of photographs taken during the collaborative projects with other artists. courtesy:saffronart#art #watercolor #painting #figurative #popularart#contemporaryartist #azistm #artvillecontemporary#artgallery

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day 
T M Azis
Untitled
Year: 2007
Medium: Watercolor on paper
Size: 30 x 22 in 

T.M. Azis is known to create human figures interacting with the other elements in a painting. Figures or objects performing as symbols spinning around allegories as conceived by the artist. He creates paintings, which record what might be ordinary, everyday occurrences, contemplated by him. A certain insight into behavioral thought, we realise that there is a world different from what see – the world that exists in our minds. 

It is interesting to note that there are no decisive tactics, no fixed strategies in his work. Azis allows himself to be influenced by places around him and situations that he encounters. Simple objects and people in their vicinities rejoice in their existence by being involved in what is around. 

The paintings do not project a grand décor, and even with its simplicity there is a certain magic and lightness about it. The different conversations performed by figures with the ‘designs’ lines or concentric circles in the paintings pleasantly create subtle movements on the surface reciting a visual rhythm to the viewer. 

The paintings are constructed using bright colors sometimes and sometimes not so contrasting colors, which plainly have strong individual personas expressing a subtle theater of visual form. 

In today’s contemporary art scenario, artists are fast adapting to new trends. T.M. Azis, primarily a painter, has also a prolific collection of photographs taken during the collaborative projects with other artists. 
courtesy:saffronart

#art #watercolor #painting #figurative #popularart#contemporaryartist #azistm #artvillecontemporary#artgallery

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day 
Tallur L.N.
Untitled
Year: 2007
Medium: Inflatable bed, silicon, latex rubber, medical cot and forceps
Size: 275 x 280 x 160 cm

Bangalore born Tallur is an Indian artist who has rarely ventured outside India and grew up in the rural community. His works speak of the grinding poverty in the cultivated countryside. Employing Indian signs and symbols, Tallur conceives works that are characteristic of the underbelly of India, while still successfully managing to translate the anxiety of his subject matter to a larger audience. Untitled contains a hospital bed, with battered and torn inflatable mattresses piled high. The bed with the added sound of breathing, inflates and deflates like lungs. Tallur’s work delivers an incredibly depressing sight and sign of the objects of social utilitarianism. His sculptural works are riddled with the agony of laboured situations. For the artist, there is a pleasurable absurdity in the dishevelled traditions of the farmlands and the villages when compared to the new American-styled hyper-real cities that function as cash accumulators.
courtesy:saatchi

‪#‎art‬ ‪#‎installation‬ ‪#‎newmedia‬ ‪#‎inflatablebed‬ ‪#‎medicalcot‬ ‪#‎popularart‬‪#‎contemporaryartist‬ ‪#‎tallurln‬ ‪#‎artvillecontemporary‬ ‪#‎artgallery‬