Artville Presents the third edition of India’s Biggest live Painting Festival to honour Mahatma Gandhi 

Remembering Mahatma - 2014

Event date: 2nd October 2014
Time: 2pm onwards 
Venue: Rangoli Metro Art Center, MG Road, Bangalore

For participation apply online: https://www.artville.in/apply-remembering-mahatma.html
or Email: events@artville.in /
SMS RM2014 to 9742020666 / Call : 080-40944107, 9632250492

Materials will be provided at the venue
Mediums available: Acrylic paints, Charcoal, Water Colour
Please bring your own brush set and other required tools

Selected paintings will be exhibited at 
the gallery till 5th October 2014

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day 
Chintan Upadhyay
Title: SIMPLY A SAMPLE
Year: 2008
Medium: Oil and acrylic on canvas
Size: 84 x 180 in.

The subject of Upadhyay’s work is often babies, animated and stylized against a bold solid background, they are stripped of the simplicity of their vulnerable nature. From blank slate to something slightly more affected, the imagery of culture is impressed upon them visually in tattoo like designs.

The artist began as a painter, but now creates sculptures and installations of which he paints the surface. His most popular sculpture project is perhaps the “Pet Shop” project, which is an ongoing production of a “model baby” for every season. It’s a social critique on consumer society; in a similar vein a solo exhibition of Upadhyay’s at Nagpal Gallery, Mumbai was provocatively named Designer Babies. Transforming painting and sculpture into a pop art hybrid, the painted imagery is often sourced from traditional Indian miniature painting, so on the whole the pieces tend to look forward and look back at the same time. 
courtesy:aicon

#art #painting #figurative #babies #popularart #contemporaryartist#chinthanupadyay #artvillecontemporary #artgallery

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day Vivan SundaramBaricade (with Props)Year: 2008Medium: Digital print on paperSize: 38.5 x 62.5 in Vivan Sundaram, painter, sculptor, installator is a key figure in a group of contemporary artists, who have, over the last decade, moved away from the enterprise of easel painting. Opposed to the comfort of looking at art from a drawing-room perspective or with disengagement, Sundaram, is more committed to realising multidimensional projects which invite audience participation as in open-stage theatre where, the distance between spectator and performer is minimal. You can sit inside a room, or on a car-seat or bed or within a sheltered space, for instance, in a hut with live video and music to experience and evoke multiple meanings. Sundarama’s work is conceived as a cultural product or debate rather than fine art to hang on the wall. It crucially relates to social and political history, the environment and to historiography itself. The viewer can take part in looking and thinking about event and issue and story in response to painted, crafted constructions and enclosures which are placed as excavated phenomena on the stage or, what can be a museum-like gallery space. Alternatively, the exhibition arena resembles an abandoned machine workshop or the karkhana (factory,in Urdu) of a toy-maker. Sundarama’s monumental artworks or relic-like objects acquire different meanings on different sites. An industrial landscape, is polemically represented as a totem-like structure, made with charcoal on paper and a tray of gleaming engine oil; the body of a man, killed in a communal riot, photographed by a reporter is an appropriated image, used by Sundaram as a “Fallen Man” emblem for many exhibitions; the memorial cum gateway,(a recurrent theme) made with tin trunks, the dwellings, cast as the House/Boat compositions or the dilapidated trawler-boat and its fragments are the image-structures which recur as the grammer of the environmental condition he models and re-models. The sculptures are erected and dismantled for shows in different cities.Their architectural instability, their incompleteness, along with the recently, added animistic exhibits of a bed with soft toys and the shell of an old fiat car with velvet seat and neon lights, point to a willful narration about strife, about the seduction and control of mechanical-electronic paraphernalia and about wishing and dreaming. Unsettling the gaze of the viewer is towards a purpose. It is to solicit an intellection to invite participation in the construction of history, and to jostle personal memories his and ours-so that the installation area becomes a speaking space. Sundaram had put up a mammoth installation at the Durbar Hall, Victoria Memorial, (A British-built building in Calcutta, which houses one of the largest libraries in Asia) in 1999. This site specific, turn-of-the-millenium endeavour was an alternative look at history, seen through artifacts of the colonial period and after, put together as cinematic montage and illumined as fragments of a mis-en-scene. (A theatrical- cinematic term, literally, Â’to put into a scenea’) In his latest venture, shelter the structure of the cube, the boat, the carcass-shell of the car, turned into a sofa or turned into an advertisement-object with blinking lights, an odoriferous bunk bed reeking with childhood memories, are things and forms which become a collection to be re-used and hauled from one exhibition into another. The shows demonstrate the aspiration to the condition of architecture, theatre, and the cinema where, remembrance is the key motif and the solid objects are like images in a pop up picture book.In the manner of an itinerant bard, Sundaram rephrases, transforms, renews his artworks as he exposes the deeds and words he has witnessed, heard or conjured himself. In the role of narrator, or a cine-theatrical director, he eliminates himself as author/individual artist. He collaborates with workmen as carpenters, masons, stone-cutters and photographers and video film makers so that the collective effort of many persons is dramatised as though he were unraveling hero-lauds. The actors, in the scenario are expectedly, the visitors to his exhibition. Sundaram has made space for that : To view and walk through the gallery or location in a way so as to be able to re-construct time and saga, individually, and by means of his contrary, often ragged artwork-documents .courtesy:saffronart #art #digital #popularart #contemporaryartist #vivansudaram#artvillecontemporary #artgallery

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day 
Vivan Sundaram
Baricade (with Props)
Year: 2008
Medium: Digital print on paper
Size: 38.5 x 62.5 in 

Vivan Sundaram, painter, sculptor, installator is a key figure in a group of contemporary artists, who have, over the last decade, moved away from the enterprise of easel painting. 

Opposed to the comfort of looking at art from a drawing-room perspective or with disengagement, Sundaram, is more committed to realising multidimensional projects which invite audience participation as in open-stage theatre where, the distance between spectator and performer is minimal. You can sit inside a room, or on a car-seat or bed or within a sheltered space, for instance, in a hut with live video and music to experience and evoke multiple meanings. 

Sundarama’s work is conceived as a cultural product or debate rather than fine art to hang on the wall. It crucially relates to social and political history, the environment and to historiography itself. The viewer can take part in looking and thinking about event and issue and story in response to painted, crafted constructions and enclosures which are placed as excavated phenomena on the stage or, what can be a museum-like gallery space. Alternatively, the exhibition arena resembles an abandoned machine workshop or the karkhana (factory,in Urdu) of a toy-maker. 

Sundarama’s monumental artworks or relic-like objects acquire different meanings on different sites. An industrial landscape, is polemically represented as a totem-like structure, made with charcoal on paper and a tray of gleaming engine oil; the body of a man, killed in a communal riot, photographed by a reporter is an appropriated image, used by Sundaram as a “Fallen Man” emblem for many exhibitions; the memorial cum gateway,(a recurrent theme) made with tin trunks, the dwellings, cast as the House/Boat compositions or the dilapidated trawler-boat and its fragments are the image-structures which recur as the grammer of the environmental condition he models and re-models. The sculptures are erected and dismantled for shows in different cities.Their architectural instability, their incompleteness, along with the recently, added animistic exhibits of a bed with soft toys and the shell of an old fiat car with velvet seat and neon lights, point to a willful narration about strife, about the seduction and control of mechanical-electronic paraphernalia and about wishing and dreaming. 

Unsettling the gaze of the viewer is towards a purpose. It is to solicit an intellection to invite participation in the construction of history, and to jostle personal memories his and ours-so that the installation area becomes a speaking space. 

Sundaram had put up a mammoth installation at the Durbar Hall, Victoria Memorial, (A British-built building in Calcutta, which houses one of the largest libraries in Asia) in 1999. This site specific, turn-of-the-millenium endeavour was an alternative look at history, seen through artifacts of the colonial period and after, put together as cinematic montage and illumined as fragments of a mis-en-scene. (A theatrical- cinematic term, literally, Â’to put into a scenea’) 

In his latest venture, shelter the structure of the cube, the boat, the carcass-shell of the car, turned into a sofa or turned into an advertisement-object with blinking lights, an odoriferous bunk bed reeking with childhood memories, are things and forms which become a collection to be re-used and hauled from one exhibition into another. 

The shows demonstrate the aspiration to the condition of architecture, theatre, and the cinema where, remembrance is the key motif and the solid objects are like images in a pop up picture book.In the manner of an itinerant bard, Sundaram rephrases, transforms, renews his artworks as he exposes the deeds and words he has witnessed, heard or conjured himself. In the role of narrator, or a cine-theatrical director, he eliminates himself as author/individual artist. He collaborates with workmen as carpenters, masons, stone-cutters and photographers and video film makers so that the collective effort of many persons is dramatised as though he were unraveling hero-lauds. 

The actors, in the scenario are expectedly, the visitors to his exhibition. Sundaram has made space for that : To view and walk through the gallery or location in a way so as to be able to re-construct time and saga, individually, and by means of his contrary, often ragged artwork-documents .
courtesy:saffronart 

#art #digital #popularart #contemporaryartist #vivansudaram#artvillecontemporary #artgallery

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day K G SubramanyanUntitledMedium: Acrylic on canvasSize: 60 x 300 in This one of the work comprises five canvases, each measuring 60 x 60 inK.G. Subramanyan is among the few artists who have explored the possibilities of modern art from a different perspective, giving new dimensions to the human figure by making them appear more as characters from various myths and traditional narratives, populating a composition quite the contrary. As an artist he is extraordinarily versatile, cherishing the facility to work in diverse media, sizes, and techniques over a stylistic conformity to a single medium, genre, size, technique, and manner of visualization. A prolific writer, scholar, teacher and art historian, Subramanyan uses his in-depth knowledge of various artistic traditions to create fantastical images of wit and eroticism that are universal in their appeal, yet coupled with iconic symbols drawn from Indian legends and folklore. Subramanyan has time and again aimed at blurring the boundaries between art and the artisan. The artist has also dabbled in glass painting and toy making, even weaving, which is generally considered ‘artisanal’. Even in his written works, the exploration of art as a language or means of communication is a recurring theme. Subramanyan has also illustrated as well as authored fiction for children. courtesy:saffronart#art #painting #figurative #popularart #contemporaryartist #kgsubramanian#artvillecontemporary #artgallery

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day 
K G Subramanyan
Untitled
Medium: Acrylic on canvas
Size: 60 x 300 in 
This one of the work comprises five canvases, each measuring 60 x 60 in

K.G. Subramanyan is among the few artists who have explored the possibilities of modern art from a different perspective, giving new dimensions to the human figure by making them appear more as characters from various myths and traditional narratives, populating a composition quite the contrary. As an artist he is extraordinarily versatile, cherishing the facility to work in diverse media, sizes, and techniques over a stylistic conformity to a single medium, genre, size, technique, and manner of visualization. 

A prolific writer, scholar, teacher and art historian, Subramanyan uses his in-depth knowledge of various artistic traditions to create fantastical images of wit and eroticism that are universal in their appeal, yet coupled with iconic symbols drawn from Indian legends and folklore. Subramanyan has time and again aimed at blurring the boundaries between art and the artisan. The artist has also dabbled in glass painting and toy making, even weaving, which is generally considered ‘artisanal’. Even in his written works, the exploration of art as a language or means of communication is a recurring theme. Subramanyan has also illustrated as well as authored fiction for children. 
courtesy:saffronart

#art #painting #figurative #popularart #contemporaryartist #kgsubramanian#artvillecontemporary #artgallery

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day
VALAY SHENDE
Untitled, 
Year: 2014
Medium: mixed media on stainless steel discs
Size: 10 1/2 × 7 1/2 in

Inspired by his surroundings, Shende uses his body of work to capture the challenges and dichotomies that characterize India today, particularly the striking divide between modern and industrial views on one hand, and traditional religious ones on the other. His recent sculptures, unique in both their process and scale, are intricately built out of minute metal discs, pocket watches, copper-plated fiberglass and other non-traditional materials. The combination of video art and sculptural installations in his practice is also unique, adding an entirely new dimension to classical ideas of sculpture. 
Courtesy:saffronart

#art #sculpture #ironbox #popularart#contemporaryartist #valayshende#artvillecontemporary #artvillegallery

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day Yusuf Arakkal,Title: Generation Gap,Medium: Oil on Canvas Year: 2001

His early abstract paintings with colors reflecting the superficial glamour of city life were followed in the mid-’ 70s by compositions with wheels, drainage pipes and other geometrisized structures which referred to wretched living conditions of the urban poor. Soon his concern with people and wider social issues made him focus on the human figure, though always seen as bound with, even defined by the environment. After a few canvases of a partly super realistic nature dealing with drought, famine, untouchability, etc. He reached his constant style which has a link with a realist basis but generalizes it with a graceful, if non-specific roughness. One of such paintings depicting inhabitants of pipes and pavements won him a national award in 1983. Arakkal works in series of related images- from sensual, icon-like ladies to sick in hospital beds and wheelchairs, urchins playing with kites and paper masks, ironic images of paper politicians and empty chairs bearing human presence. “Throughout he has depicted working -class and village people set against dilapidated walls, among shaky planar divisions, hazy texturing and diffused to sharp and vibrating arbitrary chiaroscuro, all partially enclosed by the frames-within-aflame motif. His figures in moods ranging from vaguely atmospheric to restless, dejection, quiet joy and sensuousness, are flattened as well as plastic, emerging from and nearly dissolving into their backgrounds. Arakkal has worked also with sculpture in wood, stone, ceramic and bronze, did collages, graphics and water colors. He writes poetry and articles on art.courtesy:contemporaryindianart
‪#‎art‬ ‪#‎oilpainting‬ ‪#‎figurative‬ ‪#‎popularart‬ ‪#‎contemporaryartist‬ ‪#‎yusufarakkal‬‪#‎artvillecontemporary‬ ‪#‎artgallery‬

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day 
Yusuf Arakkal,
Title: Generation Gap,
Medium: Oil on Canvas 
Year: 2001

His early abstract paintings with colors reflecting the superficial glamour of city life were followed in the mid-’ 70s by compositions with wheels, drainage pipes and other geometrisized structures which referred to wretched living conditions of the urban poor. Soon his concern with people and wider social issues made him focus on the human figure, though always seen as bound with, even defined by the environment. After a few canvases of a partly super realistic nature dealing with drought, famine, untouchability, etc. He reached his constant style which has a link with a realist basis but generalizes it with a graceful, if non-specific roughness. One of such paintings depicting inhabitants of pipes and pavements won him a national award in 1983. Arakkal works in series of related images- from sensual, icon-like ladies to sick in hospital beds and wheelchairs, urchins playing with kites and paper masks, ironic images of paper politicians and empty chairs bearing human presence. “Throughout he has depicted working -class and village people set against dilapidated walls, among shaky planar divisions, hazy texturing and diffused to sharp and vibrating arbitrary chiaroscuro, all partially enclosed by the frames-within-aflame motif. His figures in moods ranging from vaguely atmospheric to restless, dejection, quiet joy and sensuousness, are flattened as well as plastic, emerging from and nearly dissolving into their backgrounds. Arakkal has worked also with sculpture in wood, stone, ceramic and bronze, did collages, graphics and water colors. He writes poetry and articles on art.
courtesy:contemporaryindianart

‪#‎art‬ ‪#‎oilpainting‬ ‪#‎figurative‬ ‪#‎popularart‬ ‪#‎contemporaryartist‬ ‪#‎yusufarakkal‬‪#‎artvillecontemporary‬ ‪#‎artgallery‬

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day Jitish KallatUntitled (Eclipse)Year:2009Medium: Acrylic on canvasSize: 78 x 138 in Jitish Kallat “…is among the most attentive chroniclers of the postcolonial city seized by the crisis of globalization: he studies its pathologies of violence; he dwells on the fortuitous groups, the crowds of rioters or the assembly of people waiting for a train, that have replaced the cohesive community; he examines the life of labour, commemorates the cyclerickshaw puller and the load-bearing porter. And he records these phenomena, not as impersonal socialscientific memoranda, but through the tender, terrifying immediacy of the painted surface”courtesy:saffronart#art #painting #figurative #popularart #contemporaryartist #jitishkalllat#artvillecontemporary #artgallery

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day 
Jitish Kallat
Untitled (Eclipse)
Year:2009
Medium: Acrylic on canvas
Size: 78 x 138 in 

Jitish Kallat “…is among the most attentive chroniclers of the postcolonial city seized by the crisis of globalization: he studies its pathologies of violence; he dwells on the fortuitous groups, the crowds of rioters or the assembly of people waiting for a train, that have replaced the cohesive community; he examines the life of labour, commemorates the cyclerickshaw puller and the load-bearing porter. And he records these phenomena, not as impersonal socialscientific memoranda, but through the tender, terrifying immediacy of the painted surface”
courtesy:saffronart

#art #painting #figurative #popularart #contemporaryartist #jitishkalllat#artvillecontemporary #artgallery

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day Thota vaikuntam Untitled Medium : Acrylic on Canvas Size: 137 x 122 cmThota Vaikuntam hails from Andhra Pradesh, in South India, and finds his inspiration in the rural areas of the state. Men and women of his village are often the central characters of his work. Telangana women, in particular, are frequent subjects for his works. The obsession can be traced back to his childhood, when he used to be fascinated by the male artists who used to impersonate female characters in the travelling theatre groups that performed in his village. He admits finding the women of his village very sensuous and that he only attempts to capture their vibrancy. In an interview with Saffronart, the artist explains his early apprehensions when it came to art. “…In private I began sketching images which were very Indian, but which I thought were quite shocking. They were very obviously inspired by the spiritual and sensuous tradition that’s part of Indian mythology and art. I hid them from public eye, because I thought they were very sexual.” Vaikuntam’s art has a sense of strength to it, a power that emanates from the paint or charcoal that he applies to the surface, from his controlled lines, and from the fine strokes that he executes. He generally uses only primary colours, as he believes that composite colours do not exist in nature and are therefore, unnatural. As he explains, “I like using rich primary colours, which give a sense of character and depth to my paintings. Like reds and saffron and even orange, because these are essentially Indian colours. I don’t like using colours that are mix of two, because they are not natural, they don’t exist in surroundings around us, in our everyday life”. courtesy:saffronart #art #painting #figurative #popularart #contemporaryartist #thotavaikuntam#artvillecontemporary #artgallery

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day 
Thota vaikuntam 
Untitled 
Medium : Acrylic on Canvas 
Size: 137 x 122 cm

Thota Vaikuntam hails from Andhra Pradesh, in South India, and finds his inspiration in the rural areas of the state. Men and women of his village are often the central characters of his work. Telangana women, in particular, are frequent subjects for his works. The obsession can be traced back to his childhood, when he used to be fascinated by the male artists who used to impersonate female characters in the travelling theatre groups that performed in his village. He admits finding the women of his village very sensuous and that he only attempts to capture their vibrancy. 

In an interview with Saffronart, the artist explains his early apprehensions when it came to art. “…In private I began sketching images which were very Indian, but which I thought were quite shocking. They were very obviously inspired by the spiritual and sensuous tradition that’s part of Indian mythology and art. I hid them from public eye, because I thought they were very sexual.” 

Vaikuntam’s art has a sense of strength to it, a power that emanates from the paint or charcoal that he applies to the surface, from his controlled lines, and from the fine strokes that he executes. He generally uses only primary colours, as he believes that composite colours do not exist in nature and are therefore, unnatural. As he explains, “I like using rich primary colours, which give a sense of character and depth to my paintings. Like reds and saffron and even orange, because these are essentially Indian colours. I don’t like using colours that are mix of two, because they are not natural, they don’t exist in surroundings around us, in our everyday life”. 
courtesy:saffronart 

#art #painting #figurative #popularart #contemporaryartist #thotavaikuntam#artvillecontemporary #artgallery

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day
Puja Vaish
Title: structure, De Sign and Play
Medium: Oil on Canvas
Size: 9 x 9 ff (9 panels of 3 x 3 ft approx)
Year: 2007 

Puja is a visual artist from Delhi who has done her graduate and post-graduate studies at the Faculty of Fine Arts, M.S. University, Baroda. She has received the Nasreen Mohamedi scholarship for Painting and has exhibited her work in several shows. Having taught at the Fine Arts faculty, Baroda and at the Delhi College of Art, she is currently teaching at the Raheja College of Art & Architecture, Mumbai.
courtesy:storyltd

#art #painting #popularart #contemporaryartist #pujavaish#artvillecontemporary #artgallery

Artville Contemporary Artist Of The Day 
Om Soorya 
Title: Illuminated
Medium: Oil On Canvas 

Om Soorya paints surreal landscapes that are occupied by both negative and positive energies, which he depicts in many different forms. 
His use of pigment is fluid and intuitive. The mood created by his rich deep tones and lines, which vary from crisp to watery blurs, is much like a twilight zone – the time in-between events; neither here nor there. The absence of figuration in Soorya’s works renders these already isolated environments even more abandoned, making them seem as though they are frozen in time and space. 
Soorya has always maintained that aesthetics are just as important as content. Lighting plays an integral role in creating the transcendental feel that his paintings have, as also in giving them their ethereal glow. Together with the other elements of his compositions, it enables the viewer to sense the fragile relationship between the meditative Zen-like quality of the painting and the overwhelming anxieties of material living. 
As the artist notes, “My recent works are an extension of the style of painting which I have been practicing for a few years. When I started this language, my main concern and challenge was how to have a dialogue between the conventional idea of painting and new urban visions; how to bring a meditative space of silence from new urban complexities. The new Indian urban man satisfies his spiritual and meditative sensualities by visually consuming the new landscape from a very different perspective. In reality we don’t have time to spend enjoying a sunset or sunrise. Everywhere there is wall in the wall, a very flat surface of ideas. What all we have is a breath of silence when we see a panoramic night view from our apartment terrace. The urban man has limited his spiritual quest to his new possible positive visual sensibilities. In a very informative world chatting on the internet has assumed the form of chanting mantras. Surfing has become a kind of mediation. The new generation has learned to consume an alternative physical space for its own existence. Here my paintings are limited to explore these possibilities of visual sensibilities. While the world is shrinking to the space of a shell, the imaginative space is exploding to new sensibilities. By creating a very personalized landscape of language what I want to provide is a breathing meditative space of visual reality.”
courtesy:saffronart 

#art #painting #landscape #surrealist #popularart#contemporaryartist #omsoorya #artvillecontemporary#artgallery